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Speakers

Chris Buechler
Chris started in the *nix world with Linux in 1997, but switched to BSD in 2000 and has never looked back. While not much of a programmer, he is a significant contributor to several BSD-related open source projects in the areas of documentation, system administration, and contributions to mailing lists. He's most involved with the m0n0wall firewall project, having contributed a good portion of the documentation, and nearly 2,000 messages to the mailing lists. He has been a m0n0wall committer since 2004. He co-founded the pfSense firewall distribution in 2004. He also administers the infrastructure for the BSD Installer project. By day, he is responsible for the LAN, WAN, servers and security for a regional bank.

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D'Arcy Cain

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Brooks Davis
Brooks Davis is a Senior Member of Technical Staff in the High Performance Computing Section if the Computer Systems Research Department at the Aerospace Corporation. He has been a FreeBSD user since 1994 and a FreeBSD committer since 2001. He earned a Bachelors Degree in Computer Science from Harvey Mudd College in 1998. His computing interests include high performance computing, networking, security, mobility, and, of course, finding ways to use FreeBSD in all these areas. When not computing, he enjoys reading, cooking, and pounding on red-hot iron in his garage blacksmith shop.

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Jason Evans
Jason Evans has worked on FreeBSD off and on since the 3.x days, mainly due to his irrational love of multi-threaded programming. He is currently studying computational biology at the University of Idaho, where he looks for excuses to develop new programming languages.

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Reyk Floeter
Reyk Floeter is a co-founder of .vantronix | secure systems, a company specialized in Open Source security in Hannover, Germany. He is the chairman of the EICAR Task Force on Wireless LAN Security and works as an OpenBSD hacker on improving the free wireless support.

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John-Mark Gurney
John-Mark Gurney grew up programming computers. After learning C++, he went looking for a free compiler and, in 1994, found FreeBSD. He became a committer in 1997. As FreeBSD has expanded its platform support, he worked on the sparc64 architecture and supported a new ARM SoC that included a suite of device drivers. He has also done MP work, including making kqueue MP-safe.

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David Gwynne

David Gwynne got involved in unixish systems in 2000 when he needed it at home for his coursework and as a way to share his net connection. After deciding he wasn't smart enough to understand the documentation in Linux he settled on OpenBSD. Since that beginning he has worked in development and system administration roles and has pushed for the use of BSD operating systems and software wherever possible. In 2004 he was given commit access to the OpenBSD tree after working on USB2 support.

He is now working for the University of Queensland in Australia as a Systems Programmer. Unfortunately he is unable to spend much time on BSD software at work since it doesn't require as much attention as everything else in the machine room. He tries to make up for this in his spare time and works on improving hardware support.

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Peter N. M. Hansteen
Peter N. M. Hansteen is Senior Consultant at Datadokumentasjon A/S in Bergen, Norway. A freenix user since the mid 1990s, he tends to networks in between documentation related tasks. Advocates freenixes via the local BLUG and national NUUG user groups, where he is a member of the core group and board member respectively. A member of the original RFC1149 implementation team.

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Olivier Houchard
Olivier Houchard is a software developer for a french ISP. He became a FreeBSD committer in 2002. He worked on various areas of the kernel, started and is currently maintaining the FreeBSD/arm port.

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Poul-Henning Kamp
Poul-Henning worked on FreeBSD before it was even called that. He tries to survive as self-employed FreeBSD contractor and spends far too much time on non-billable projects to ever become rich that way. He served six years on the core team for undue enthusiasm, and is one of the people who have moved the most junk in and out of the FreeBSD CVS tree. Amongst his creations are the FreeBSD release building framework, md5 based password scrambling, phkmalloc(3), DEVFS, GEOM, GBDE and a couple of thousand other CVS commits he can't quite remember what did.

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Kris Kennaway
Kris Kennaway has been a FreeBSD committer since 1999, is a former FreeBSD Security Officer, and is currently a member of portmgr, the Port Management Team. He currently spends most of his FreeBSD time working on QA of FreeBSD and of the Ports Collection, and sending annoying emails to port maintainers. In his other life he is a theoretical physicist at the University of Toronto.

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Max Laier
Max Laier is 24 years old and lives in Karlsruhe, Germany where he studies computer science at the "University of Karlsruhe (TH)". As part of this effort he is currently working for Ph.D. cand. Christian Vogt on Mobile IPv6 Improvements. He started to love BSD systems around OpenBSD 2.9 and was later drawn to FreeBSD where he now maintains a port of "pf". In his free time, Max enjoys the movies, electronic music and a beer with friends.

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Dru Lavigne
Dru Lavigne is a network and systems administrator, IT instructor and author. She has over a decade of experience administering and teaching Netware, Microsoft, Cisco, Checkpoint, SCO, Solaris, Linux and BSD systems. A prolific author, she pens the popular FreeBSD Basics column for O'Reilly and is author of BSD Hacks. She is the current acting chair of BSD Certification Group Inc., a non-profit organization with a mission to create a standard for certifying BSD system administrators.

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Greg Lehey
Greg Lehey is a FreeBSD and NetBSD developer and an ex-member of the FreeBSD core team. He has been in the computer industry for 30 years, most of them spent in Germany, in which time he has performed most jobs, ranging from kernel development to product management, from systems programming to systems administration, from processing satellite data to programming petrol pumps, from the production of CD-ROMs of ported free software to DSP instruction set design. He is the author of ``Porting UNIX Software'' (O'Reilly and Associates, 1995) and ``The Complete FreeBSD'' (O'Reilly and Associates, 2003).

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Mark Linimon
Mark Linimon started out working on early microprocessor-based designs centered around the Intel 8080A and derivatives. He was a very early customer of BSDi and participated in Usenet starting in the 2400 baud UUCP days. He has had some kind of Unix-derived system at home since late 1988.

In his career, Mark has worked on systems to: read oil logging data from oilfeed tools; analyze bacterial samples in machine tool lubrication systems; mix components for paint; authenticate the legitimacy of Levi's Jeans; read documents for the IRS; automate telephone testing equipment; and distribute databases to multiple CPUs.

He has been a FreeBSD user since the late 1990s, a contributor since 2002, and on the ports management team since 2004. To date, his main interests have been the ports infrastructure; the FreeBSD documentation; and the Problem Reports (PR) database.

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Scott Long
Scott Long is 31 years old and live near Boulder, CO, with his wife and 2 children. He has been hacking on FreeBSD since 1994 and has been a committer since 2000. He's also led the Release Engineering team since 2003. His main interests in FreeBSD have ranged from RAID drivers, SCSI and filesystems to threading and PCI infrastructure. He previously spent 4 1/2 years at Adaptec in the Open Source Driver Group. Presently, he works for Copan Systems doing FreeBSD filesystem and infrastructure work. When not in front of a computer, he enjoys snowboarding, camping, and building Legos with his kids.

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Warner Losh
Warner Losh has been a BSD developer for the past 10 years and an active contributor to the open source community for the past 15.

Mr. Losh maintains the PC Card and CardBus software in FreeBSD, serves on the FreeBSD Core Team, mediates project disputes, improves kernel infrastructure, and keeps his collection of NEC-PC9821 machines alive.  Mr. Losh has contributed code to NetBSD, OpenBSD, and Linux/mips.  Outside of open source, Mr. Losh works in Boulder, Colorado, building high-precision time and frequency systems for Timing Solutions, which uses FreeBSD in embedded and semi-embedded systems.

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Kip Macy
Kip Macy has been a FreeBSD user since 1997 and a committer since 2005. His development interests center on FreeBSD and virtualization. His latest efforts involve work on the UltraSparc T1 hypervisor, Xen, and VMI.

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Hugo Meiland
Hugo Meiland is working at the Science Faculty of Leiden University, The Netherlands. While not maintaining hpc clusters or the faculty network, time is spend on hacking open source code, building model airplanes or restoring his house in the centre of Leiden.

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der Mouse
der Mouse has been involved in computers for nearly thirty years, a NetBSD developer for over eight, and an advocate of open source for longer than it has had the name, writing and giving away software for most of those thirty years. der Mouse gravitates towards OS hackery (especially virtualization) and networking, but is a bit of a jack of all trades

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George V. Neville-Neil
George Neville-Neil is a FreeBSD committer and co-author, with Marshall Kirk McKusick of "The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System", as well as a columnist for ACM Queue (Kode Vicious). He has been involved in BSD activities since working at the University of California at Berkeley in 1991 and his interests are in the areas of operating systems, networking, security and code spelunking. More information on code spelunking, and several web pages dedicated to spelunking all the BSDs are is available at: http://www.codespelunking.com/index.html

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Marco Peereboom
Marco Peereboom got involved with Open Source UNIXi in '96. After years of patching and hacking he decided to look for alternatives that suited his needs better and became interested in the OpenBSD project in 2001. After working on fixing up the SCSI mid-layer and working on mpt(4) he ended up as a committer on all things SCSI. He now works all over the tree scratching whatever itches.

He works for a large computer manufacturer in central Texas as a Sr. engineer where he has held several software and hardware development positions. His work has been concentrated on a wide range of server and storage products. In his spare time he enjoys hacking the OpenBSD kernel around a busy social schedule.

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Colin Percival

Colin Percival is 23 years old and lives in Vancouver, Canada. He received his B.Sc. in Mathematics from Simon Fraser University at age 19, and is currently awaiting his D.Phil. in Computer Science from Oxford Univeristy.

In addition to being a FreeBSD committer and security team member since January 2004, Colin is responsible for the FreeBSD Update binary security update tool and the Portsnap secure ports updating tool.

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Attilio Rao
Attilio Rao is studying electronic engineering at the first University of Rome. He dedicates his spare time to computer security, low level programming, operating systems developments (in particular FreeBSD, of course) and playing soccer. He is a staff member of GUFI (FreeBSD Italian UserGroup).

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Michael Richardson
Michael Richardson has been involved with network security systems since 1988. Michael was a founding employee at Milkyway Networks in 1994, and Solidum Systems Corporation in 1998. While at Milkyway Networks, Michael was responsible for developing the VPN components of the BlackHole firewall, the policy engine, and all kernel components. Solidum designed and sold hardware - IPsec being an important target. Michael is a system software designer and protocol designer. Michael is involved on a daily basis with at the IETF. He is an author on RFC3586, RFC4025 and RFC4332.

Michael was has architected a number of IPsec systems, including closed source systems at SSH, work on KAME code on BSD, and work on the Linux FreeS/WAN project.

Michael is now a principle at Xelerance Corporation, the open source security specialists, current maintainers of the Openswan IPsec stack.

Michael received a B.Sc. Physics from Carleton University.

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Ollivier Robert
Ollivier Robert has been a FreeBSD developer for more than 10 years now and playing with 386BSD and various UNIX before. He has worked on several areas in FreeBSD including documentation, VFS layer and ports. He is now maintaining the ntp utilities. VCS has been a special interest of his for a long time and recent tools make him think it may be time to switch over.

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Jan Schaumann
Jan Schaumann is a System Administrator at Stevens Institute of Technology, where he maintains a NetBSD based environment across dozens of workstations, numerous public laboratories, as well as a number of clustered high performance computing facilities, servers and various other computing facilities. The tasks involved in all of this are, as any SysAdmin will know, often surprising but far too many to be listed here.

Jan holds a BS and an MS degree in Computer Science and teaches graduate classes in UNIX programming as well as System Administration. As a NetBSD developer, he ported the pkgsrc tools to IRIX, runs bulk-builds on that platform, finds himself as the maintainer of a number of packages, manages the www team and produces press releases.

He enjoys life in New York City together with his wife and will happily drop anything (including his laptop!) in order to go skateboarding, snowboarding and surfing. You can reach him at <jschauma@netmeister.org>.

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Matt Schwartz

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Mike Silbersack
Mike Silbersack became a FreeBSD committer in June of 2001, with the intention of making the FreeBSD TCP/IP stack resistant to every possible attack within a few weeks. While that goal has not yet been realized, during that time Mike did manage to complete his B.S. in Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his M.S. in Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Most recently, he has landed a job at a technical college where he gets to share his enthusiasm for computers with his students.

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Wes Sonnenreich
Wes Sonnenreich is a co-founder of SageSecure, a provider of innovative information asset management solutions. Wes has authored a number of books on security and network technologies, most recently including Network Security Illustrated, published in October 2003 by McGraw-Hill. He also actively conducts research in the economics of information security; of recent note he is on the program committee for the 2006 IEEE Information Assurance Workshop at West Point and his work on Return on Security Investment modeling has been published in the 2005 Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology. Wes frequently lectures on information security topics; he has twice presented for the NYC BSD Users Group (NYCBUG). He hold a B.S. in Computer Science and Music from M.I.T.

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Murray Stokely

Murray Stokely has served the FreeBSD Project as a core team member, release engineer, and handbook editor. Professionally, he has worked for Walnut Creek CDROM, BSDi, Wind River Systems, and now serves as vice president of FreeBSD Mall, Inc. Interests include documentation architecture, release engineering, and advocacy.

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Massimiliano Stucchi
Massimiliano Stucchi runs WillyStudios.com, a consulting company focusing on wed and data services in the Milan area, Italy. He recently helped a national telco extend his coverage on the IP market, and is now managing a carrier-grade VoIP network (not all on his own). Max has now taken the effort of organizing EuroBSDCon 2006, which will be held in Milan on November 10-12, with the help of the Italian FreeBSD Users Group (GUFI), where he has been serving in the staff for 3 years now. In his spare time, he enjoys watching WTA tour tennis, playing chess, and coaching a junior soccer team.

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Russell Sutherland
Russell Sutherland, has devoted most of his waking life to the University of Toronto, as an Engineering student, mathematics teacher and staff member in the Computing and Networking Services group. Short naps have been spent working in both the nuclear and renewable energy sectors. Russell has played with Unix for many years, beginning with Bell Labs version 6, in 1978. In his spare time he reads theological literature.

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Scott Ullrich
Scott has been working with the BSD's since 1995, and is an active contributor to several BSD-related projects. He's been using BSD firewalls since 1995. He is a FreeSBIE committer, and a DragonFly BSD committer, working mainly on the BSD Installer. He co-founded the FreeBSD-based firewall distribution pfSense in 2004. By day, he is the IT Manager for an advertising agency.

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Robert Watson
Robert Watson is a researcher at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory investinging operating system and network security. Prior to joining the Computer Laboratory to work on a PhD, he was Senior Principal Scientist at McAfee Research, now SPARTA ISSO, a leading security research and development organization, directing government and commercial research contracts for customers that include DARPA, the US Navy, and Apple Computer. His research interests include operating system security, network stack structure and performance, and windowing system structure. He is also a member of the FreeBSD Core Team and president of the FreeBSD Foundation.

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