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This pages lists the presentations, papers, and talks which have not yet been added to the schedule.

If you would like to add an item to this list, please contact us at papers@bsdcan.org.

A Software Approach to Distributing Requests for DNS Service using GNU Zebra, ISC BIND 9 and FreeBSD
This paper describes an approach for deploying authoritative name servers using a cluster of hosts, across which the load of client requests is distributed. DNS services deployed in this fashion enjoy high availability and are also able to scale to increasing request loads in a straightforward manner.

The approach described here does not employ any custom load-balancing appliances (e.g. devices commonly marketed as as "layer-four switches", "content switches" or "load-balancers"); instead the individual members of the cluster announce a service address to one or more gateway routers by participating in routing protocols to provide an intra-cluster anycast architecture.

speaker: Joe Abley

location: TBA


Automated source branch selection using SH/CVS
Demonstration of how minimalist sh is used to automate selection and checkout of multiple releases from the FreeBSD CVS repository including extraction of the latest tags from CVS.

speaker: Allan Fields

location: TBA


BSD and IPv6: security perspective
The talk covers BSD and IPv6 (KAME implmentation), from security point-of-view. There are many implementation choices KAME project have made to provide a secure IPv6 stack from day one. Choices include API tweaks, protocol stack implementation techniques and other stuff. The presentation will cover gory details of the choices as well as possible security threats.

speaker: Jun-ichiro itojun Hagino

location: TBA


Developing a wireless community group: a social and technical perspective
The Ile sans fil project is a community group started with a vision that it is possible to use wireless technologies to foster actual human interaction and local communities. It is as much a technical experiment as it is a social one. The talk will discuss how to start a wireless community group and the pitfalls to avoid, the challenges of doing technical work in an un-traditional setting, the technical challenges of the GOAT project (building a wireless metropolitan network using mesh routing), the WifiDog captive portal project and the true range of Wifi equipment in an urban setting.

speakers: Benoit Gregoire, Michael Lenczner

location: TBA


Exploit Mitigation Techniques
Even after huge efforts to increase software quality, bugs will remain. The clever attacker understands the unintended side-effects created by a bug, as well as the system environment the code lives in, and crafts an exploit which grants him advantage. It is high time for defensive technologies which make it harder to write an exploit. Recent and upcoming developments make the environment which Unix processes live much more hostile towards exploitation, without impacting well-behaving processes.

speaker: Theo de Raadt

location: TBA


Extreme Programming in a Geographically Dispersed Project
Extreme Programming <http://www.extremeprogramming.org/> (XP) is a name given to a process which many of us have followed for years. When applied to projects in which the participants are not in the same location, there are several challenges which arise. This presentation outlines those challenges and demonstrates how XP can be successfully used on Geographically Dispersed Projects.

speaker: Michael Richardson

location: TBA


GBDE
While encrypting a disk or a filesystem is not very hard to do, it is hard to do it well. Traditionally the focus have been under the cryptographic hood with little attention to usability and deployability of the resulting code, and consequently deployment have been very limited.

GBDE was designed with usability and cryptographic given equal priority, and the result is a disk encryption facility where you can trust your data to not fall in the wrong hands and still implement a sensible security policy at the same time.

This talk will explain how GBDE works and how it can be used to implement a security policy for vulnerable disks.

speaker: Poul-Henning Kamp

location: TBA


GEOM
GEOM, the new disk I/O subsystem in FreeBSD 5 <http://www.freebsd.org/>, is an infrastructure component which allows pluggable "classes" to perform arbitrary transformations on disk I/O requests.

In addition to traditional transformations like partitioning, this allows things like RAID, multipath-selection, encryption, volume management and anything else we can think off to be implemented in a modular and architecturally sane way.

This talk will take the listener through the design and implementation, showing how the mechanics and dynamics of GEOM works with disks which come and go without warning, and people mix architectures and disks indiscriminantly.

speaker: Poul-Henning Kamp

location: TBA


Introduction to pf
OpenBSD's <http://www.openbsd.org/> packet filter (pf) has been gaining popularity and has some very powerful features. This talk introduces pf and shows you some of the most popular features and capabilities.

speaker: Ryan McBride

location: TBA


Introduction to pseudo and stackable file systems under BSD
An introductory look at pseudo file systems and vnode stacking under BSD. Exploration of FiST and template based file systems.

speaker: Allan Fields

location: TBA


IP Law and Innovation
This lecture will examine the phenomenon of Free/Libre Open-Software (FLOSS) and its effect on innovation in the field of computer software development. The lecture will begin with an introduction to copyright law and the licensing of the intellectual property contained in source code. This will involve some discussion of proprietary vs. non-proprietary intellectual property. We will also examine recent alternatives to traditional licensing schemes. Time permitting, we may examine some of the different FLOSS licenses made available by proponents of this open source movement.

speaker: Marcus Bornfreund

location: TBA


Network Buffer Allocation in the FreeBSD Operating System
This paper outlines the current structure of network data buffers in FreeBSD and explains their allocator's initial implementation. The current common usage patterns of network data buffers is then examined along with usage statistics for some of the allocator's supporting API routines. Finally, the improvement of the allocation framework to support SMP in FreeBSD 5.x is outlined and an argument is made to extend the general-purpose allocator to support some of the specifics of network data buffer semantics.

speaker: Bosko Milekic

location: TBA


Network Security Monitoring with Sguil
Many people use open source intrusion detection tools, but most concentrate on collecting only alert data. To fully investigate incidents, alert data must be supplemented by session and full content data. Without this complementary information, it's seldom possible to validate and escalate security events without performing host-based forensics or other time-intensive tasks.

Sguil (http://sguil.sf.net) is an open source interface to all three types of network-based evidence. It was developed on FreeBSD but is also deployed on OpenBSD and Linux. This talk will explain the sorts of data one can collect and examine using short case studies from real world traffic. It will conclude with a live demo of Sguil on FreeBSD.

speaker not assigned

location: TBA


Raising Awareness About BSD in the Government of Canada
The only significant barrier to use of xBSD operating systems in the Canadian Government seems to be a lack of awareness among IT decision-makers about this set of options, and of the related xBSD support services offered by suppliers. Open source off-the-shelf solutions are deployed in a diversity of production environments throughout the Government of Canada. Treasury Board Secretariat has stated that "existing Canadian federal legislation, agreements and policies accommodate a wide variety of business models for public sector software acquisition, use, production and distribution. Accordingly, software solutions used in government come under many license types, including certified 'open source' and 'free/libre' software licenses." In this session, participants will discuss ways to raise awareness of the several BSD operating systems available to the Government of Canada.

speaker: Joseph Potvin

location: TBA


Slony-I, a new enterprise level replication system
Slony-I, a new enterprise level replication system is currently being developed and will be available under the BSD license. The proposed key features are:

  • Anynchronous Master to multiple Slave
  • Cascaded Slaves
  • Hot install, join and reconfigure (no interruption when adding slaves)
  • Failover including new Master inherits existing Slaves
  • DB Version independant, usable for upgrade via switchover

The presentation will explain the reason for developing "yet another" asynchronous replication system for PostgreSQL, and why the proposed features are essential for the second part of the Slony story.

speaker: Jan Wieck

location: TBA


Talk on encrypted filesystems w/ comparison paper
An inventory and comparison of encrypted file systems available for BSD. A practical look at current file system encryption technologies available for BSD.

speaker: Allan Fields

location: TBA


The NetBSD cross platform build environment
Software project management tools play a key role in making effective use of developers' time. The mechanisms to track software changes, and consistently and easily reproduce executables are two of the most key ones. The NetBSD build.sh-based build environment makes it easy for The NetBSD Project to package binary releases of NetBSD-current and the latest release branch on a near daily basis. This talk will discuss the problems that build.sh solves for anyone using NetBSD, as a desktop/server OS, or embedded platform.

speaker: David Maxwell

location: TBA


The Reusable Appliance Platform for Internet Devices (RAPID)
St. Bernard Software created the Reusable Appliance Platform for Internet Devices (RAPID) as a basis for producing internet access management appliances. These appliances are complex devices whose operation is critical to customer networks. The application domain requires high functionality and high reliability, a combination often difficult to achieve.

The Device Environment: there is no sysadmin, there is no console, it must always boot, it has to be secure

Disk Layout: it must always boot, saving non-volatile information, backup and restore

Booting Services: it must always boot, saving non-volatile information, backup and restore

This presentation will present the challenges in creating RAPID and the architectural decisions made by the St. Bernard IAM team in meeting those challenges, as well as some of the unique parts of the RAPID architecture developed in-house by the IAM team.

speaker: Wes Peters

location: TBA


Trusted Operating System Features
Robert Watson will describe a variety of pieces of work done as part of the TrustedBSD Project, including the TrustedBSD MAC Framework, Audit facilities for FreeBSD, as well as supporting infrastructure work such as GEOM/GBDE, UFS2, OpenPAM. He will also discuss how certification and evaluation play into feature selection, design, and documentation.

speaker: Robert Watson

location: TBA


Using Bacula over untrusted networks
Bacula <http://www.bacula.org/> is not as widely known and used as AMANDA, yet it has a features and design which makes it superior to AMANDA. It is quickly gaining ground in the Open Source network backup solution arena. This presentation will introduce Bacula and describe a simple solution for backing up remote machines over untrusted networks.

speaker: Dan Langille

location: TBA


Using FreeBSD to provide Firewall and VPN services for an advertising agency
This talk explains how we are using FreeBSD servers as firewalls and VPN endpoints in a corporate environment. It explains what our goals were, the challenges that we faced and the solution we came up with.

It also covers the basics required for configuring firewalls on FreeBSD and what you need to do to get a VPN going between a FreeBSD and a Checkpoint NG device.

Lastly, it explains the benefits we've received by going this route

speaker: Wayne Pascoe

location: TBA


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